About Us

The Osborne Association works in partnership with individuals, families, and communities to create opportunities for people affected by the criminal justice system to further develop their strengths and lead lives of responsibility and contribution. We design, implement and advocate for solutions that prevent and reduce the damage caused by crime and incarceration.

Our programs draw upon research and evaluation that has demonstrated success with people involved in the criminal justice system, and are designed to be family-focused, supporting participants within the context of their family relationships and communities—strengthening relationships that are the bedrock of our participants’ future success.

More than 250 staff in community sites in New York City, Newburgh, NY, and more than 30 prisons and jails work at every point of the continuum, from arrest and pre-entry, through jail and prison, to reentry, including children and families affected by crime and the criminal justice system. We are known for developing effective programs that offer a broad range of treatment, education, and vocational services to more than 10,000 people each year. 

 

Our Mission

The Osborne Association offers opportunities for individuals who have been in conflict with the law to transform their lives through innovative, effective, and replicable programs that serve the community by reducing crime and its human and economic costs. We offer opportunities for reform and rehabilitation through public education, advocacy, and alternatives to incarceration that respect the dignity of people and honor their capacity to change.

 

Our History

Osborne has an 84 year history working with currently and formerly incarcerated men, women, and children and families affected by incarceration.

Thomas Mott Osborne — an industrialist and former mayor of Auburn, NY — spent a voluntary week in Auburn prison in 1913 as prisoner Tom Brown, #33,333x. He left that harrowing experience committed to the goal of turning America’s prisons from “human scrap heaps into human repair shops.” Mr. Osborne later became warden of Sing Sing prison and has been called the “pioneer and prophet of prison reform.” The Osborne Association was established in 1933 to continue his legacy after his death.

 

Our Community Locations

BRONX

809 Westchester Avenue
Bronx, NY 10455
718-707-2600

BROOKLYN

175 Remsen Street, Ste 800
Brooklyn, NY 11201
718-637-6560

NEWBURGH

388 Ann Street
Newburgh NY, 12550
845-345-9845